Researchers Discover Critical Security Flaws Found In Nuke Plant Radiation Monitors

wiredmikey writes from a report via Security Week: Researchers have discovered multiple unpatched vulnerabilities in radiation monitoring devices that could be leveraged by attackers to reduce personnel safety, delay detection of radiation leaks, or help international smuggling of radioactive material. Ruben Santamarta, a security consultant at Seattle-based IOActive, at the Black Hat conference on Wednesday, saying that radiation monitors supplied by Ludlum, Mirion and Digi contain multiple vulnerabilities. There are many kinds of radiation monitors used in many different environments. IOActive concentrated its research on portal monitors, used at airports and seaports; and area monitors, used at Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). However, little effort was required for the portal monitors: "the initial analysis revealed a complete lack of security in these devices, so further testing wasn't necessary to identify significant vulnerabilities," Santamarta explained in his report (PDF). In the Ludlum Model 53 personnel portal, IOActive found a backdoor password, which could be used to bypass authentication and take control of the device, preventing the triggering of proper alarms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

SpaceX’s very first Falcon Heavy launch set for this November

 Falcon Heavy, the high-capacity rocket created by SpaceX designed for bringing very large loads to orbit and beyond, will get its first launch this coming November, according to SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk. Musk shared the news on Instagram on Thursday, posting an image of a concept depiction of the rocket’s launch alongside the target date. The Falcon Heavy uses the combined power… Read More

Meg Whitman says she’s not going to Uber

 Hewlett Packard Enterprise CEO Meg Whitman wants everyone to know that’s not going to Uber. Bloomberg and Recode had reported that she was on the short list for the CEO spot, but she took to Twitter to make it clear that it’s not happening. In a three-part tweet, she concluded that the “rumors” have “become a distraction,” so she wants everyone to know… Read More

Redfin real estate site prices IPO at $15, valuing company at $1.2 billion

 Redfin, the real estate site based in Seattle, has finally raised its IPO. Founded in 2004, this was 13 years in the making. Despite an ugly patent lawsuit from a former co-founder over one of Redfin’s pending patent applications — one filed just this Monday — the company priced above the $12 to $14 range, at $15 per share, a number that values the company at $1.2 billion.… Read More

Mattress startup Purple merges with NY shell company in $1.1 billion deal

 Purple, a Utah-based mattress startup announced today it will merge with Global Partner Acquisition Corp (GPAC) in a deal that would value the company at $1.1 billion. Purple was already well on its way to that valuation when we got to take a sneak peek at operations at the company’s headquarters in the small town of Alpine, Utah and its giant factory an hour away in rural Grantsville… Read More

AltspaceVR social app is shutting down

 Social VR app AltspaceVR is shutting down its main service after running out of cash. The app was one of the first VR social experiences to gain traction and was available across a variety of platforms. In a blog post titled “A Very Sad Goodbye,” the company detailed that the social VR community will be shutting down next week in a move that it described as “surprising… Read More

Heavier Rainfall Will Increase Water Pollution In the Future

An anonymous reader shares a report from National Geographic: If climate change continues to progress, increased precipitation could mean detrimental outcomes for water quality in the United States, a major new study warns. An intensifying water cycle can substantially overload waterways with excess nitrogen runoff -- which could near 20 percent by 2100 -- and increase the likelihood of events that severely impair water quality, according to a new study published by Science. When rainfall washes nitrogen and phosphorus from human activities like agriculture and fossil fuel combustion into rivers and lakes, those waterways are overloaded with nutrients, and a phenomenon called "eutrophication" occurs. This can be dangerous for both people and animals. Toxic algal blooms can develop, as well as harmful low-oxygen dead zones known as hypoxia, which can cause negative impacts on human health, aquatic ecosystems, and the economy. In the new study, researchers predict how climate change might increase eutrophication and threats to water resources by using projections from 21 different climate models, each of which was run for three climate scenarios and two different time periods (near future, 2031-2060, and far-future, 2071-2100).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook’s Instant Articles restore subscription options they previously stripped

 Facebook has announced that news sites which rely on paid subscriptions, limiting readers to a certain number of articles per week, will now be able to do so through Instant Articles. The company has spent the last two years promoting these Facebook-hosted versions of articles, which unfortunately lacked this rather critical ability. Google’s AMP and Apple News have supported it for a while. Read More

YouTube Red and Google Play Music Will Merge To Create a New Service

YouTube's head of music, Lyor Cohen, confirmed that the company is planning on merging its Google Play Music service with YouTube Red to create a new streaming offering. "The important thing is combining YouTube Red and Google Play Music, and having one offering," Cohen said. The Verge reports: Right now, YouTube's music ecosystem is unnecessarily complicated. There's YouTube Red, which removes ads from videos and lets you save them offline, while also giving you access to Google Play Music for free. Then there's YouTube Music, which anyone can use, but it gets better if you're signed up for YouTube Red. And YouTube TV is also a thing -- an entirely separate thing -- but it's not available everywhere yet. The merger has been rumored within the industry for months, and recently picked up steam after Google combined the teams working on the two streaming services earlier this year. In a statement to The Verge, Google said it will notify users of any changes before they happen. "Music is very important to Google and we're evaluating how to bring together our music offerings to deliver the best possible product for our users, music partners and artists. Nothing will change for users today and we'll provide plenty of notice before any changes are made."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.